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Politics

From democracies to authoritarian regimes, government policies can have life and death stakes for citizens. Pulitzer Center stories tagged with “Politics” feature reporting on elections, political corruption, systems of government and political conflict. Use the Pulitzer Center Lesson Builder to find and create lesson plans on politics.

 

Murder in Malta

Daphne Caruana Galizia was Malta’s most dogged and controversial journalist. Last year she was murdered. Alexander Clapp travelled to the island to find out why.

At the Khmer Rouge Tribunal

The Khmer Rouge Tribunal—"Asia's Nuremberg"—was created in 1997 to bring accountability for the Khmer Rouge era atrocities. 20 years and $320 million later, it has secured only three convictions.

September 20, 2018

Murder on Malta

Alexander Clapp

In October 2017, the most famous investigative journalist on the island of Malta, Daphne Caruana Galizia, was murdered by a car bomb while driving home from work. Why?

September 18, 2018

The Ballymurphy Precedent

Callum Macrae

In The Ballymurphy Precedent, Collum Macrae probes the killings of 10 unarmed Catholics, including a priest and a mother of eight, in the West Belfast housing estate of Ballymurphy in August, 1971.

September 06, 2018

Foreign Influence in the Balkans

Krithika Varagur

Krithika Varagur reports on foreign religious and political investment in the Balkans, focusing on Bosnia and Kosovo, which have been affected by both rising extremism and populism.

August 15, 2018

Life in a Dying Democracy

Zack Beauchamp

Hungary's democracy is on the brink of total collapse. How could this happen in an advanced European nation? And what does Hungary's crisis mean for the future of democracy globally?

August 13, 2018

Helping the Poor: What Works in Rwanda?

Marc Gunther

Governments, foundations, and nonprofits aim to help the world's poorest people by giving them livestock, cash, training, and education. What works best? How do we know?

August 08, 2018

A Journey Through Contested Lands: Tanzania

Thomas Dworzak

A moving photo essay about the Maasai in northeast Tanzania, who are struggling to make a living on ancestral lands that the government keeps trying to take away.

August 07, 2018

The Prison Next Door

Jill Langlois, Lianne Milton

Brazil’s prison system is in crisis. The wives and mothers of inmates at Alcaçuz—some who live right next door to the maximum-security prison—are its unseen victims.

July 30, 2018

Losing Earth

Nathaniel Rich, George Steinmetz

Thirty years ago, we could have saved the planet. The world was ready to act. But we failed to do what was necessary to avoid a catastrophe.

July 08, 2018

The Enduring Allure of Mexico's Zapatistas

Jared Olson

An army of campesinos armed with little but words, a social movement, and a radical democratic project buried deep in the Mexican jungle: The Zapatistas defy easy categorization. This is their story.

July 05, 2018

Detained, Deported, Deserted

Sylvia Varnham O’Regan

New Zealanders make up the largest group of people inside Australian detention centers, and hundreds have been deported in recent years—an issue that’s causing mounting social and political tensions.

Meet the Journalist: Mark O'Connell

Mark O'Connell travels to New Zealand to investigate how an extremist libertarian manifesto from 1997 influenced Silicon Valley libertarians like Peter Thiel to acquire apocalypse boltholes in New Zealand.

Meet the Journalist: Reese Erlich

President Trump has said he will tear up the Iranian nuclear accord. What do ordinary Iranians think of this and other Trump policies? Journalist Reese Erlich produced this video in Tehran.

Meet the Journalist: Yepoka Yeebo

For over a decade, there existed a fake U.S. Embassy in Accra, Ghana. When the news broke, there were more questions than answers and some officials are convinced it didn't happen.

Meet the Journalist: Peter Gwin

How does a country fail? Peter Gwin spent three years traveling to the Central African Republic to look at how a rebellion destroyed the nation and what's happened to its wealth of resources.

This Week: Family Divided at the Border

This week: reunification dreams stall due to continuing crisis along the border, Cape Town's water issues run deep, and Bhopal's 34-year-old environmental disaster still plagues residents.

This Week: The U.S.-Mexico Border: A View from Above

This week: Trump's plan to build a wall between the U.S. and Mexico is still in question, a growing alliance between Russia and the Central African Republic threaten the U.S.'s influence in the region, and see the highlights of the Pulitzer Center's recent conference weekend.