Issue

Conflict and Peace Building

Nearly 30 years after the Rwandan genocide, thousands of maimed amputees remind us of the war that took 500,000 lives in 100 days. War leaves marks that cannot be erased—not only in Rwanda, but on every continent.

Reporting from Conflict and Peacebuilding examines the roots of conflict, whether it be religious hatred, sectarian rivalry, a security vacuum, the struggle for natural resources, or the desperation that results from poverty.

Pulitzer Center journalists also cover war’s aftermath: the transitional governments that result in chaos, diplomacy that goes awry, peace talks that never end, and the people who suffer the consequences, young and old. We see the children who go hungry, lose their homes, leave school, become combatants, or join the jihad.

Often the end to conflict leaves turmoil in its wake while the road to peace seems circuitous: In South Sudan, rebel-commanders-turned politicians plunge the country into civil war. In the U.S., troops return home from one war only to be re-deployed to another. But everywhere, in every conflict, there are also voices crying out for peace, determined to heal the divide.

 

Conflict and Peace Building

Massif Expedition

The Colombian Massif region is crucial to the country's survival, providing 70 percent of Colombia's drinking water. Now, the once-pristine landscape faces threats from deforestation, mining, and the illegal crop industry.

Syria: The Next Chapter

The Syrian war: We see the headlines, but know far less about the people caught in the conflict's crosshairs. What comes next for them, and how will that impact the future of the country and the wider Middle East?

Inside Jordan: Life after the Syrian War

Jordanian Identity is as ambiguous as it is rapidly evolving. After decades of championing coexistence, Jordanian identity remains an elusive social and political phenomenon.

Russia's Real Foreign Policy

What does Russia really want and how does it get it? A look at Russian foreign policy—from agenda to implementation—in Europe and the Middle East.

Guatemala's Disappeared

Thousands of people were disappeared during the civil war. Fault Lines meets families still searching for justice.

The Rebirth of the Shi'a-Sunni Divide

After years of the raging wars in Iraq and Syria, most people still think the conflicts are about territory and political power. But religious practice and belief have a lot to do with it.

Meet the Journalist: Dominic Bracco

Photojournalist Dominic Bracco II's reporting follows Diego, a former gang member on his personal journey for reconciliation and redemption. In this video Bracco gives a behind-the-scenes look at the history of violence in Juarez.

This Week: Poverty in America

This Week: Nearly one in five children in America suffers from being poor, deportations are straining relations between Australia and New Zealand, and ISIS has undermined faith in Iraq.

Related Events